ROMEO AND JULIET PLAY PDF

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BENVOLIO nephew to Montague, and friend to Romeo. TYBALT Romeo and Juliet: ACT I .. You are welcome, gentlemen! come, musicians, play. A hall, a. Enter ROMEO .. Enter CAPULET, with JULIET and others of his house, meeting the Guests and You are welcome, gentlemen! come, musicians, play. A hall. CHORUS. PRINCE ESCALUS, Prince of Verona. PARIS, a young Count, kinsman to the Prince. MONTAGUE, heads of two houses at variance with each other.


Romeo And Juliet Play Pdf

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Romeo and Juliet is a tragedy written early in the career of William It was among Shakespeare's most popular plays during his lifetime and, along with Hamlet. Bornges Juliet. THE GRAPHIC NOVEL. William Shakespeare. ORIGINAL TEXT VERSION. Script Adaptation: John McDonald. Character Designs & Original. Google is proud to partner with libraries to digitize public domain materials and make them widely accessible. Public domain books belong to the public and we .

Turn back, dull earth, and find thy centre out. He climbs the wall, and leaps down within it.

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Now, ere the sun advance his burning eye, The day to cheer and night's dank dew to dry, I must up-fill this osier cage of ours With baleful weeds and precious-juiced flowers. The earth that's nature's mother is her tomb; What is her burying grave that is her womb, And from her womb children of divers kind We sucking on her natural bosom find, Many for many virtues excellent, None but for some and yet all different.

O, mickle is the powerful grace that lies In herbs, plants, stones, and their true qualities: For nought so vile that on the earth doth live But to the earth some special good doth give, Nor aught so good but strain'd from that fair use Revolts from true birth, stumbling on abuse: Virtue itself turns vice, being misapplied; And vice sometimes by action dignified.

Within the infant rind of this small flower Poison hath residence and medicine power: For this, being smelt, with that part cheers each part; Being tasted, slays all senses with the heart. Two such opposed kings encamp them still In man as well as herbs, grace and rude will; And where the worser is predominant, Full soon the canker death eats up that plant.

Came he not home to-night? Torments him so, that he will sure run mad. O, he is the courageous captain of compliments. He fights as you sing prick-song, keeps time, distance, and proportion; rests me his minim rest, one, two, and the third in your bosom: O, their bones, their bones!

Perchance she cannot meet him: O, she is lame! Therefore do nimble-pinion'd doves draw love, And therefore hath the wind-swift Cupid wings. Now is the sun upon the highmost hill Of this day's journey, and from nine till twelve Is three long hours, yet she is not come.

Had she affections and warm youthful blood, She would be as swift in motion as a ball; My words would bandy her to my sweet love, And his to me: But old folks, many feign as they were dead; Unwieldy, slow, heavy and pale as lead.

O God, she comes! Do thou but close our hands with holy words, Then love-devouring death do what he dare; It is enough I may but call her mine. Therefore love moderately; long love doth so; Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow. A public place.

Romeo and Juliet

The day is hot, the Capulets abroad, And, if we meet, we shall not scape a brawl; For now, these hot days, is the mad blood stirring. Thy head is as fun of quarrels as an egg is full of meat, and yet thy head hath been beaten as addle as an egg for quarrelling: O simple!

Spread thy close curtain, love-performing night, That runaway's eyes may wink and Romeo Leap to these arms, untalk'd of and unseen. Lovers can see to do their amorous rites By their own beauties; or, if love be blind, It best agrees with night.

Come, civil night, Thou sober-suited matron, all in black, And learn me how to lose a winning match, Play'd for a pair of stainless maidenhoods: Hood my unmann'd blood, bating in my cheeks, With thy black mantle; till strange love, grown bold, Think true love acted simple modesty.

Come, night; come, Romeo; come, thou day in night; For thou wilt lie upon the wings of night Whiter than new snow on a raven's back.

Come, gentle night, come, loving, black-brow'd night, Give me my Romeo; and, when he shall die, Take him and cut him out in little stars, And he will make the face of heaven so fine That all the world will be in love with night And pay no worship to the garish sun. O, I have bought the mansion of a love, But not possess'd it, and, though I am sold, Not yet enjoy'd: O, here comes my nurse, And she brings news; and every tongue that speaks But Romeo's name speaks heavenly eloquence.

Enter Nurse, with cords. Affliction is enamour'd of thy parts, And thou art wedded to calamity. Look you, she loved her kinsman Tybalt dearly, And so did I: I promise you, but for your company, I would have been a-bed an hour ago.

Madam, good night: I think she will be ruled In all respects by me; nay, more, I doubt it not. Wife, go you to her ere you go to bed; Acquaint her here of my son Paris' love; And bid her, mark you me, on Wednesday next-- But, soft!

Well, Wednesday is too soon, O' Thursday let it be: Will you be ready? We'll keep no great ado,--a friend or two; For, hark you, Tybalt being slain so late, It may be thought we held him carelessly, Being our kinsman, if we revel much: Therefore we'll have some half a dozen friends, And there an end.

Romeo and Juliet

But what say you to Thursday? Go you to Juliet ere you go to bed, Prepare her, wife, against this wedding-day. But he which bore my letter, Friar John, Was stay'd by accident, and yesternight Return'd my letter back. Then all alone At the prefixed hour of her waking, Came I to take her from her kindred's vault; Meaning to keep her closely at my cell, Till I conveniently could send to Romeo: But when I came, some minute ere the time Of her awaking, here untimely lay The noble Paris and true Romeo dead.

She wakes; and I entreated her come forth, And bear this work of heaven with patience: But then a noise did scare me from the tomb; And she, too desperate, would not go with me, But, as it seems, did violence on herself. All this I know; and to the marriage Her nurse is privy: and, if aught in this Miscarried by my fault, let my old life Be sacrificed, some hour before his time, Unto the rigour of severest law. Where's Romeo's man? This letter he early bid me give his father, And threatened me with death, going in the vault, I departed not and left him there.

Where is the county's page, that raised the watch? Sirrah, what made your master in this place? PAGE He came with flowers to strew his lady's grave; And bid me stand aloof, and so I did: Anon comes one with light to ope the tomb; And by and by my master drew on him; And then I ran away to call the watch. PRINCE This letter doth make good the friar's words, Their course of love, the tidings of her death: And here he writes that he did download a poison Of a poor 'pothecary, and therewithal Came to this vault to die, and lie with Juliet.

She first tries to talk to her nurse, but she is not satisfied with her advice — to marry Paris since he is a better match, and decides to ask for help from Friar Lawrence. He has a plan that is supposed to reunite the lovers. The night before she is to be wed to Paris, Juliet must drink a poison that will only make her look dead for some time. The only thing he hears is that his love is dead. He cannot imagine living without her, so he decides to end his life as well.

There, he meets Paris, whom he kills in a fight. Just a moment too late, Juliet awakes.

She realizes the tragedy that has occurred and does not see a point in living anymore. The two families arrive at the tomb and are torn apart by the sight. Realizing that their rage made their children unhappy , they decide to bury the hatchet and build a new, peaceful Verona. Romeo and Juliet Epilogue Although this is a tragic drama, all is well in the end — if you take the general wellbeing of the people in Verona as your focal point.

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Click To Tweet Do you bite your thumb at us, sir? Click To Tweet Parting is such sweet sorrow that I shall say goodnight till it be morrow.Go you to Juliet ere you go to bed, Prepare her, wife, against this wedding-day. Perchance she cannot meet him: Is there a person that does not know their love story? First Watchman Here is a friar, and slaughter'd Romeo's man; With instruments upon them, fit to open These dead men's tombs.

First Watchman A great suspicion: stay the friar too. O heavens! It was the nightingale, and not the lark, That pierced the fearful hollow of thine ear; Nightly she sings on yon pomegranate-tree: A street.